An Island, But Not Alone.


Be sure to check out the Sturgeon Lake Restoration project update post next!

As any island would say, it can get lonely...but not on Sauvie Island. Sauvie Island, located just north of Portland and south of Scappoose, is the largest island along the Columbia River, at 26,000 acres, and one of the largest river islands in the United States.

A large portion of the island is designated as the Sauvie Island Wildlife Area; where, Sturgeon Lake, in the north central part of the island, is the most prominent water feature. The land area is 32.75 square miles - predominantly used for farmland, wildlife refuge, and is a popular place for picking pumpkins, hunting geese, and kayaking (not to mention the go-to Collins 'bare essentials' Beach during summer months).

Today, however, these significant human and wildlife benefits are at risk, as this wonderful resource slowly disappears into mud.

Although Sturgeon Lake is open, siltation (the process of a water body becoming clogged with sediment) is still taking place because there’s only one way for water to enter and exit the lake. The tidal-influenced water that flows into Sturgeon Lake daily, drains out so slowly that the sediment suspends, settles, and accumulates.

The average depth of Sturgeon Lake in 1941 was about 6ft. Today it’s half that.

We are working with West Multnomah Soil & Water Conservation District, to raise the funds needed to restore the lake's connection to the Columbia River. The connection called the Dairy Creek channel, would help water move in and out of Sturgeon Lake more rapidly isn’t currently functioning.​ This project is designed to open up the debris and sand-plugged creek, and restore flushing tidal flow to the lake from the Columbia River.

We are excited to announce that the Reeder Road bypass construction on NW Reeder Road where Dairy Creek passes underneath has begun. On Monday, July 2nd, a groundbreaking ceremony was performed by Wisdom of the Elders, a First Peoples group dedicated to recording and preserving traditional cultural values, oral history, and prophecy.

Please watch our video, donate, and share this critically important project with your family and friends.


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